“Some of the narrator’s insights are expressed so beautifully that if you heard them over and over…you would memorize them or, if there were people around, start demanding silence for them…” -Lee Sheppard, The Rusty Toque

“All of the stories here…have a broken-in quality that sucks you right in, like you’re finally learning the backstories of all the regulars at a small-town bar…”  –David Berry, The National Post

“[A] series of emotionally complex visions rich with colloquial dialogue…” 
Andrew Patterson, The Coast

“A cast of guarded characters surveying the barriers they’ve created, but never fully understanding why these barriers are created in the first place. Preventing the trespassing of the bad, but also the good. Photo-realistic renderings of lives at impasse and the unclear way forward…”
Dylan T. Green, Weird Canada

“This is an excellent collection of short stories by a Canadian renaissance woman… I’ve seen her perform as a gifted actress and here she is writing these captivating stories that seamlessly blend witty humour and earthy gravitas.” -CBC blog post What’cha Readin’?

“It is charming, but more than that. Absolutely unique, and engaging…”
Lynn Crosbie

“These stories can be frustratingly truncated—often ending just as we’ve fallen for their subjects… [H]er ability to carve tragedy, humour, and insight into each vignette leaves us wanting more. And that’s a good thing.” 
-Mark Teo, This Magazine


From True Stories Told Live, a series by the brilliant Marsha Shandur. This story is about a lifetime conversation my mom and I have been having about death. May 28, 2019 at the Garrison in Toronto.

Women To The Front (W2TF) is an  exhibition produced by Savanah Sewell , co-founder of The Grickle Grass Festival, Winter Spectacular and London Girls Rock Camp. Savanah emailed me about contributing to the W2TF zine, asking if I had ‘a poem about being a woman in the music biz.’ I didn’t at the time, but told her I’d happily figure something out (following my rules of rewarding collaboration, which include ‘always say YES to the amazing Savanah Sewell’). I feel honoured to have contributed to the W2TF zine, ingeniously crafted by activist and artist,  Jenna Rose Sands .   Here’s what I wrote .

Women To The Front (W2TF) is an exhibition produced by Savanah Sewell, co-founder of The Grickle Grass Festival, Winter Spectacular and London Girls Rock Camp. Savanah emailed me about contributing to the W2TF zine, asking if I had ‘a poem about being a woman in the music biz.’ I didn’t at the time, but told her I’d happily figure something out (following my rules of rewarding collaboration, which include ‘always say YES to the amazing Savanah Sewell’). I feel honoured to have contributed to the W2TF zine, ingeniously crafted by activist and artist, Jenna Rose Sands.

Here’s what I wrote.

The legendary  SappyFest  was co-founded by Julie Doiron, Paul Henderson and Jon Claytor. Shortly after Sappy VIII, Jon emailed me about a book he and the Sappy team were working on. “The reason I am writing is to ask you to contribute to SappyForever,” he wrote. “It could be a story that seems to fit, memories, a metaphysical review of Misha's state of mind over the course of the festival… Are you into it?” I was into it. I went the metaphysical route.   Here’s what I wrote .

The legendary SappyFest was co-founded by Julie Doiron, Paul Henderson and Jon Claytor. Shortly after Sappy VIII, Jon emailed me about a book he and the Sappy team were working on. “The reason I am writing is to ask you to contribute to SappyForever,” he wrote. “It could be a story that seems to fit, memories, a metaphysical review of Misha's state of mind over the course of the festival… Are you into it?” I was into it. I went the metaphysical route.

Here’s what I wrote.


EONS  is the solo project of Matt Cully, with whom I co-founded Toronto-based band Bruce Peninsula (along with Neil Haverty) in 2006.  Long Walks  is his second full-length release, a digital album accompanied by this gorgeous 44-page risograph-printed book that acts as a visual guide to the music. Matt asked me to contribute some writing to  Long Walks , and luckily, he liked the first draft I sent. “Mish, I love this,” he replied. “It would be nice to have it handwritten on a piece of paper. But both of our handwriting is a bit illegible, so we’ll just keep it typed for now.” And so it remained.   Here’s what I wrote.

EONS is the solo project of Matt Cully, with whom I co-founded Toronto-based band Bruce Peninsula (along with Neil Haverty) in 2006. Long Walks is his second full-length release, a digital album accompanied by this gorgeous 44-page risograph-printed book that acts as a visual guide to the music. Matt asked me to contribute some writing to Long Walks, and luckily, he liked the first draft I sent. “Mish, I love this,” he replied. “It would be nice to have it handwritten on a piece of paper. But both of our handwriting is a bit illegible, so we’ll just keep it typed for now.” And so it remained.

Here’s what I wrote.

Spencer Burton  has released several albums under the moniker Grey Kingdom, including this one called  Light, I’ll Call Your Name Out “Darkness.”  He put it out on vinyl, and asked me to write a blurb for the back cover. “A blurb, a story - a fictional body with a circulatory system of truth.” My favourite kind of writing order.   Here’s what I wrote .

Spencer Burton has released several albums under the moniker Grey Kingdom, including this one called Light, I’ll Call Your Name Out “Darkness.” He put it out on vinyl, and asked me to write a blurb for the back cover. “A blurb, a story - a fictional body with a circulatory system of truth.” My favourite kind of writing order.

Here’s what I wrote.


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“I’ve come to think of music and storytelling as intertwined processes at the root of identity. For example, a song can be viewed as a cultural artifact that exists outside us, as well as an extension of a natural musicality within us. I’m thinking of a very cool researcher named Colwyn Trevarthen as I answer this. He uses the metaphor of ‘musicality’ to describe processes of synchronization that bind our impulses and experiences into a flow of action that can be described in terms of narrative. The ongoing story of who we are, as individuals and members of community. Music and story in our lives can easily go unnoticed, like the functioning of our vital organs goes unnoticed. But when we’re engaged in deliberate synchrony at a show, for example, or storytelling at a group meeting, those parts of us can get amplified. This amplification might be like the effect of a ritualized silence or mediation, where the involuntariness of breathing is suddenly felt as an awareness of life.”

Read the full story by See Collective’s Kerry Ssemugenyi.